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Archive for May, 2011

MPLS VPN Lab Sim

May 29th, 2011 10 comments

The Indigo IT Company is a banking service that is using EIGRP AS 1 as the IGP in its network.Indigo IT Company has decided to establish connectivity between two of its sites. AdvanceNet, a service provider, has been selected by the Indigo IT Company to provide the connectivity between the two sites.

For this implementation, AdvanceNet is using a MPLS VPN solution. AdvanceNet has already established MPLS connectivity between all of their PE routers. MPBGP connectivity has also been established on all PE routers.

Indigo IT Company has successful completed all necessary tasks on the CE routers, and AdvanceNet has successfully completed all necessary MPLS VPN configuration tasks on PE12.

MPLS_VPN_topology.jpgYour task is to successfully complete the implementation of the VPN connection by configuring the MPLS VPN on PE11 using the following information:
Privileged mode password: *********
EIGRP is to be used the PE-CE protocol for the VPN.
MPBGP is being used to propagate VPN routing information between the PE routers.
The interface supporting the Indigo Company is Serial0/0 and will have an IP address
of 150.1.244.18 255.255.255.240.

The following has been assigned to Indigo’s VPN:
The VRF name is Customer_6
The RD is 6:10
The route target for import is 14:10.
The route target for export is 14:10.
Configure EIGRP between CE11A and PE11 using AS number 10.
Redistribute from BGP to EIGRP AS 10 using metric string of 10000 100 255 11500.
Redistribute from EIGRP AS 10 to BGP using a metric of 1.
VPN is operational when you can see routes for both the local (10.1.11.10) and the remote (10.1.12.0) sites in the VRF routing table

Answer and Explanation

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Categories: MPLS Lab Sim Tags:

Share your BGP Experience

May 17th, 2011 192 comments

Please share with us your experience after taking the BGP 642-661 exam, your materials, the way you learned, your recommendations…

Your posts are warmly welcome!

Please don’t ask for links to download copyright materials here…

Categories: BGP 642-661 Tags:

Share your MPLS Experience

May 17th, 2011 129 comments

Please share with us your experience after taking the MPLS 642-611 exam, your materials, the way you learned, your recommendations…

Your posts are warmly welcome!

Please don’t ask for links to download copyright materials here…

Categories: MPLS 642-611 Tags:

Basic MPLS VPN VRF GNS3 Lab

May 9th, 2011 12 comments

Virtual Routing and Forwarding Table (VRF) allows to create multiple routing tables within a single router. Each of them is assigned to a customer; therefore customers can use the same IP (even private IP) with other customers without confusing the PE router.

GNS3_MPLS_VPN_VRF_topology.jpg

In the above example, R0 is the Provider Edge (PE) router which is on the ISP side while R1 and R2 are customer routers (CustomerA and CustomerB respectively).

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Categories: Practice CCIP GNS3 Lab Tags:

Basic MPLS Tutorial

May 4th, 2011 30 comments

MPLS is a new forwarding mechanism called “label switching” in which packets are forwarded based on labels. However, hosts are unaware about labeled packets so routers will need to add a label when entering “MPLS area” and remove that label after leaving there.

The idea of label switching is to have only the first router do an IP lookup and assign a label, then all future routes in the network can “cheat” by doing exact match “switching” based on a label. This would reduce load on the core routers, where high-performance was the most difficult to achieve, and distribute the routing lookups across lower speed edge routers.

In a traditional IP network:
* Each router performs an IP lookup (“routing”), determines a next-hop based on its routing table, and forwards the packet to that next-hop.
* Rinse and repeat for every router, each making its own independent routing decisions, until the final destination is reached.
MPLS does “label switching” instead:
* The first device does a routing lookup, just like before.
* But instead of finding a next-hop, it finds the final destination router.
* And it finds a pre-determined path from “here” to that final router.
* The router applies a “label” (or “shim”) based on this information.
* Future routers use the label to route the traffic without needing to perform any additional IP lookups.
* At the final destination router, the label is removed and the packet is delivered via normal IP routing.

Therefore in an MPLS network, data packets are assigned labels. Packet-forwarding decisions are made solely on the contents of this label, without the need to examine the packet itself.

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Categories: MPLS Knowledge Tags: